587: Dr. Philippe Hujoel Shares The Intricate Role Of Carbohydrates On Dental Health

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Oral health sciences professor and low-carb diet researcher Dr. Philippe Hujoel is our guest today on The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show with Jimmy Moore!

Dr. Hujoel quickly came to an understanding about why dental diseases have become worse and worse over the years and he concluded that it comes down to the negative implications of carbohydrate consumption as the primary culprit. He has identified carbohydrates as THE leading cause of dental caries (cavities) and other diseases involving the teeth and gums–and it’s not just sugar either. Since 2007, as a research professor of oral health sciences at the University of Washington School of Dentistry, he has closely examined the positive results of low-carb nutrition as a means for improving mouth health. Dr. Hujoel has conducted a thorough overview of the science that points the finger of blame directly at carbohydrates and a lack of Vitamin D. Listen in as Jimmy and Dr. Hujoel discuss this frequently missed benefit of livin’ la vida low-carb!

LISTEN TO JIMMY MOORE’S OTHER PODCASTS:
LINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 587
Low-Carb Conversations with Jimmy Moore & Friends podcast airing on Fridays
Dr. Philippe Hujoel bio
University Of Washington School Of Dentistry
Dr. Hujoel’s Journal Of Dental Research paper “Dietary Carbohydrates and Dental-Systemic Diseases”
– RELATED PODCAST: “Carbohydrates Can Kill” Podcast with Dr. Robert Su and Dr. Philippe Hujoel – Episode 94
– RELATED PODCAST: “Carbohydrates Can Kill” Podcast with Dr. Robert Su and Dr. Philippe Hujoel – Episode 95

3 Responses to 587: Dr. Philippe Hujoel Shares The Intricate Role Of Carbohydrates On Dental Health
  1. Lynn Weiler
    June 29, 2012 | 10:11 am

    Thank you for this show. I emailed it to my mother. Her doctor keep recommending lipator and other drugs. She has been low carb and only weighs 111.   THis helped her …..and me of course…

  2. Emma
    July 5, 2012 | 5:25 am

    I learnt a lot from this interview.  I had never made the connection that tooth decay is predictive of diabetes et al.  Thanks for this. 

  3. Zachary
    July 20, 2012 | 1:59 pm

    Love this guy, he’s so knowledgeable, honest and down to earth. He also has a rather pleasant accent :D





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